Blogs

Simon Singh takes you through the scientific journey of how we have come to learn about the origin of the universe. The story begins with the Earth-centric view of the universe and follows the scientific developments that have led to proving out the Big Bang. This book lends itself well to a wide audience as it does not delve into the mathematics.
I am a voracious reader (at least that's what my Twitter account says). I have successfully completed my mission of reading fifty (50) books each of the past three years and four out of the past five years. I love to read. Reading is a great way to, not only pass the time, but to learn and grow each and every day. As a general rule, most of the books I read are non-fiction, though I do read a few fiction books every year. The complete list of books that I read this year can be found here.
Recently, I met a friend out for lunch after he had accepted a job and was preparing to get started at his new company. It had been a while since he had started a new job, so over burritos we discussed a variety of topics.
Because I have almost twenty years of experience developing software, younger developers will often ask me for advice. Depending on the person and how much time I have to get into the details, my advice varies. Usually, it includes some number of books to read (a good topic for a future blog post) and various habits to incorporate. One piece of advice that I give, no matter who I am talking to is "learn how to Google effectively" or "Google first, ask questions later."
One of the things I love about my job is that HS2 Solutions employees are encouraged to experiment with pet projects. Usually a pet project is to experiment with a new technology and other times a pet project is to build a tool or system that makes my job easier. Recently, my pet project has been both.
Alright, off with the suspense. It's me. Well, by the time you read this, I will probably no longer be the newest, but it sounds better that way. These days there are certifications for most any technology. And, I admit, I am not a big fan of certifications. It is one thing to go through a course or study a book and take an exam at the end to be certified in a technology, but it is quite another to be well-versed enough in a technology to solve real-world problems. Often, being book smart does not translate into the ability to create systems or solve technical challenges.